Grammarian · Guest Contributions

A Grammarian script on becoming a Distinguished Toastmasters

Do you want to become a Distinguished Toastmaster? If you do, TM Samuel from Ottawa has some news from you. In this script for the role of Grammarian, TM Samuel mentions why grammatical errors are a strict no-no for a Distinguished Toastmaster. Take a look.

RELATED: How to do the role of Grammarian?

Role of Grammarian

An ordinary public speaker may not care about grammatical errors littered across his speech. But Toastmasters are no ordinary public speaker and a Distinguished Toastmaster is actually the premium version of a public speaker. And no premium product ever comes with grammatical errors littered across their labels. In Toastmasters, we help you become the premium version of a public speaker. That is why as the Grammarian today I will appreciate the good usage of your language but more importantly rectify any errors in grammar or pronunciation so that you may realise your dream of becoming a premium Distinguished Toastmaster. 

As the Grammarian today, it is also my role to enrich your vocabulary by giving you a word of the day. And the word of the day for today is “austere.”

It’s an adjective and it means severe or strict in manner or attitude or having a plain and unadorned appearance.

Here are some examples of the word usage in sentences –

The only way to prevent spread of the virus is an austere lockdown.

An austere lifestyle goes a long way in building wealth.

I hope everyone uses this word to the maximum in our meeting today. I will be back with my report towards the end of the meeting.

RELATED: How to present the Grammarian’s Report?

Thank you so much TM Samuel for this submission.

We here at mymeetingroles.com are creating a pool of scripts / ideas for various roles in Toastmasters. If you have any ideas, please share with us here or email us at hello@mymeetingroles.com.

For more ideas to introduce yourself as the Grammarian, click here.

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